Category Archives: ABORIGINAL MATTERS

WIRADJURI LANGUAGE

http://burrastree.blogspot.com/

http://www.archive.org/details/thewiradyuriando18978gut

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IN THIS YEAR : 1848 ON CLARENCE

 

 

horseshoe_6623_md

Clarence River.-Sporting.-The first attempt at getting up races was made here on the 14th instant, when a match was run for £10, mile heats, on Phillip’s Flats, at South Grafton, between Mr. Gregory’s Abdallah and Mr. Cowan’s Bailly, and won by the latter by one hundred and fifty yards. Abdullah was in splendid condition, and was the favourite at starting, having beaten his competitor some short time previously in a private match. Baldy was very cleverly jockeyed, and won with ease and in fine style.-Herald.

LINKS TO FOLLOW

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article712019

IMMIGRANTS TO CLARENCE
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article711270

CLARENCE HISTORICAL SOCIETY

LOWER CLARENCE HISTORY

“This “Line” serviced the north bank of the Clarence and Lawrence
developed as a port rather than a town. It provided for teamsters rather than farmers and a
such, the population remained small. It is not surprising that the first two buildings of note
were two hotels; the Lawrence for James Bryce and Thomas Bawden’s Commercial, both
built in 1860.
Two other buildings, which predated the above, were
Lanark Lodge and Traveller’s Rest. The former
comprised a homestead and associated buildings owned
by William Robertson on land taken up in 1842. While
Lanark Lodge was in the present town area, Traveller’s
Rest was on the adjoining run on the Grafton side. The Inn built in 1843 was an important link for many years
between the coast and tablelands developed by an early
owner, James Pringle.

It was just a day’s journey to the
deep-water port at Lawrence.”

_________________

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 13 May 1848, page 3. News

ALLEGED MURDER BY POISONING OF THE
ABORIGINES.-

Our readers will recollect that some time since Mr. Thomas Coutts, of the Clarence River, was committed by the bench of that district to take his trial on an alleged charge of poisoning certain aborigines in that locality ; and was subsequently admitted to bail to answer this charge at the June Criminal Sittings of the Supreme Court. We understand the Attorney-General has declined exhibiting any information against Mr. Coutts for the alleged murders.-Herald May 11.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article712073

 

WHO THEN IS WALTER HINDMARSH?

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article711253

CHECK THE MAITLAND MERCURY AND HUNTER RIVER GENERAL ADVERTISER SATURDAY 10 JUNE 1848 PAGE 3

WALTER CLAIMED THE FOLLOWING LEASE:
Name of run- TRAVELLER’S REST.
Estimated area – 16,000 acres
Estimated growing capabilities – 4000 sheep
bounded on the north by the dividing range between the Richmond and Clarence River and on the east by a rocky range. on the south by SALTWATER CREEK and SURVEYORS CREEK. on the west by the head of Saltwater Creek.

 

( Mary Josephine was sent to Miss Hindmarsh’s school in Kiama following the death of her father Basil on the Clarence in 1852) . Members of the Hindmarsh family were connected through marriage to the Kendalls on the Illawarra. Hindmarshes owned property adjoining the Kendalls at both Kiama and Ulladulla.

From KISSIN’ COUSINS (MARJORIE KENDALL):

IN 1857 on the headland overlooking the sea, THOMAS S KENDALL built BARROUL a colonial mansion. There was another mansion being built half a mile away: THOMAS CHAPMAN’S HARTWELL HOUSE. Four miles south in GERRINGONG, MICHAEL HINDMARSH had already built graceful, Georgian ALNE BANK in 1851. CECILIA(HINDMARSH),CAROLINE(KENDALL) and CATHERINE(CHAPMAN) RUTTER were mistresses of three of the most elegant houses.”

WHAT connection took BASIL and HIS FAMILY to the CLARENCE IN 1848 ?

 

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 3 June 1848, page 3. News

Two new schooners called the Anna Maria and Clara, from seventy to eighty tons burthen each, arrived from the Clarence River on Saturday last, having been built there by Mr. W. II. Chowne for Mr. Robey, of Sydney, expressly for the Lake Macquarie trade. The two barges of thirty tons burthen each, noticed in yesterday’s Herald as having been launched from Mr. Winship’s yard, at Stockton, on the 24th instant, are intended to work from the mines on Lake Macquarie to a depot Mr. Robey has formed near the sea entrance, from whence the above schooners will convey the coals to Sydney -May 30.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article711545

 

free-animal-clipart-2-tn

THE CLARENCE RIVER IN 1848

BASIL KENDALL was in SYDNEY early in 1848 when he received the 2 year sentence to PARRAMATTA GAOL. AT THIS stage he would appear that he did not serve that time in Parramatta and appears to have gone North with his family to Dr Dobie at Gordonbrook. Here are some more background images of the area to which they removed from Sydney.

article3715576-3-001ABORIGINES 1848

READ ON:

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3715576

_____________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article713702

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 15 January 1848, page 2. News

THE CLARENCE RIVER.-

The Phoenix had
an unusually long passage, owing to boisterous
weather, on her downward trip here. Since

my last letter we have had a good deal of rain,
sufficient to produce a fresh in the river, and
from which Mr. Crabbe, an innkeeper at the
Falls, about twenty miles above our proposed
township, unfortunately lost his life; a small
boat in which he was accidentally upsetting,
and before he could be rescued, the force of
the torrent bore him away. Mr. Crabbe was
very greatly respected, and has left a wife
and several small children to deplore their
loss. Trade, owing to the wool season, is ex-
cessively brisk. The country, from the late
visitation of rain, now looks beautiful. There
is wool enough already at Phillips’ and the
other stores to give two cargoes, in addition
to the one she now conveys, to the steamer,
and teams are daily coming down.

__________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article713428

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 2 February 1848,

page 3.

29.-Phoenix, steamer, 108 tons, Captain
Wiseman, from the Clarence River the 26th

instant. Passengers-Mr. Hunter, Mr. Plo-
mer, Mr. Hayley, ten in the steerage, one
constable, and four prisoners.

The Phoenix was detained at the Clarence
seven days, owing to the fresh in the river,
consequent upon a continuation of heavy rains.

Her cargo comprises 160 bales wool.

A very
extraordinary occurrence, and in which
equally extraordinary presence of mind was
displayed, on a snake visit, happened a few
days since. A gentleman of the name of

Gannon, staying at Phillips’ stores, being
alarmed by a noise outside, about 2 P.M. on
the 24th ultimo, rose from his bed for the
purpose of going out and discovering the
cause. Whilst in the act of unfastening the
door, by removing a heavy wooden bar, a
large snake, of the carpet species, six feet
five inches, as described per measurement
after death, fell bodily on Mr. G.’s left
shoulder, and then slowly spread itself along
the arm. Assistance was called for, but which
was however some time in arriving, and during
the arrival of which Mr. G. managed to keep
as unnerved as possible, at all events suffi-
ciently so to contrive to open the door and
get outside, but during the time of this pro-
cedure, the snake had coiled itself round Mr.
G.’s body, the tail was around the wrist, the
body part in a double fold on the bend of the
arm, and the head over the left shoulder,
spreading across the back, and crossing over
the right shoulder, its neck and head up to
the chin and lips, across which Mr. G. states
be distinctly felt the reptile twice or thrice
pass its head. A stick could not be found,
but Mr. G., after getting hold of an axe, con-
trived sufficiently to remove the coils of the
upper portion of the reptile so as to attack it
when it was in such a position as prevented
its injuring him, and on which it wholly un-
coiled itself and made off; but so great was
Mr. G.’s trepidation incident on his escape,
that the snake got away some five or six
yards from him : he however then rallied,
overtook, and finally killed it. On examining
it, it was found to be a female, and on opening
it two young ones were found inside its body.
-Extract from Letter.-S. M. Herald,

snake_jpg

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article713447

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 2 February 1848, page 3.

CLARENCE RIVER. ,

(From the S. M. Herald, January 31.)

Committal for Poisoning Blacks.-The Phoenix, which arrived on Saturday morning, brings intelligence of one of the most extensive squatters in the district, Mr. Coutts, being committed for the poisoning of several of the aborigines.

The following particulars of the case are gained from a letter dated 18th instant. In the year 1840 Mr. Thomas Coutts located on this river, at Kangaroo Creek, about thirty miles inland, and at that time his cattle numbered between eight und nine hundred, his sheep upwards of five thousand ; but owing to the repeated depredations of the blacks, he can now only number half his quantity of sheep und cattle. There has, moreover, been two of his men murdered by the blacks, as was also a fine intelligent boy, who was most barbarously so, no later than twelve months since; protection was applied for in the proper quarter, but none was rendered. Owing to the above occurrence, which of course spread like lightning, it was with much difficulty Mr. Coutts could get men to hire with him, and then only at a very advanced rate of wages.

About a fortnight since a great sensation was created at the township, and indeed along the river, in consequence of a report having been circulated that Mr. Coutts had poisoned some of the aborigines, and that some of their sable brethren had gone to the Commissioner of Crown Lands to report the case. The excitement was heightened when, some few days afterwards, it was observed that the commissioner, two policemen, and the chief constable, accompanied by a servant of Mr. Coutts-then, by the way, in custody on a warrant-proceeded in the direction of Mr. Coutts’s station. Curiosity was on the qui vive for two days after, until it was learned from a black boy attached to the commissioner that his master was returning, and that the objects of the expedition were then discovered. The commissioner and party had proceeded to a black camp for information, and they there found, and took away from thence, a piece of damper, which the blacks there encamped said was the remainder of one that had caused the death of several, and seven bodies were pointed out which were said to have died from partaking of the damper, and four of these bodies were found to be dead at a waterhole.

The commissioner’s party then proceeded to Mr. Coutts’s, and took that gentleman in custody, on a warrant, issued on the affidavit of his servant, then in custody for horse stealing, and which averred that Mr. Coutts had twelve months previously shot an aboriginal, but the circumstances already detailed were, at this time, kept from Mr. Coutts’s knowledge, and in fact he did not know a single iota about them until he arrived at the court-house in the township. On the case, in due course, coming on for hearing, the commissioner stated that from information he had received, he went to the black camp, found the bodies and damper, and subsequently proceeded to Mr. Coutts’s station, and ordered him to be apprehended ; two of Mr. Coutts’s servants were examined, but only proved that they had heard from the blacks that Mr. C. had given them some flour which produced the effect alluded to, and another witness stated that he had seen Mr. C. give the blacks a bag, which he supposed to contain flour, and at which time Mr. C. had a paper in his band, which he also supposed contained poison. The bench, in committing, allowed bail Mr. Coutts in £1000, and two sureties in £500 each ; but no sureties sufficient to satisfy the magistrates being tendered, Mr. Coutts was forwarded to Sydney by the last steamer.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article713394

Feb. 2.

THE ALLEGED MURDER OP THE

ABORIGINES AT CLARENCE RIVER.-

On Monday last, Mr. Thomas Coutts, who was committed
by the bench of magistrates at Grafton,
Clarence River, on an alleged charge of poi-
soning certain aborignal natives at KangarooHelp
Creek, in the above district, was brought
before Mr. Justice Manning in chambers, by

a writ of habeas corpus, and upon the motion
of Mr. Nichols was admitted to bail, to
appear at the March sittings of the criminal
court at Sydney, to take his trial on such
information as the Attorney General may
prefer against him. The defendant was
bound in the sum of £500, and his sureties,
Messrs. John Campbell, merchant, and Mr.

F. Garnison, grocer, in the sum of £250 each.
The bail having entered into the requisite
recognizances, Mr. Coutts was discharged.
Herald, Feb. 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COUTT’S CROSSING GRAFTON 2008CLARENCE MAY 08 016

IN THIS YEAR 1814: WEBSITES OF INTEREST

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628955

 

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WEBSITES OF INTEREST:

MACQUARIE ROOM DATABASES MACQUARIE UNIVERSITY SYDNEY

http://www.lib.mq.edu.au/databases/

  • William Temple (1779 – 1839)

http://www.lib.mq.edu.au/lmr/temple.html

    Track the history

     

    The history of the separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children

    from their families

     

    Francis Murphy

http://members.southernphone.com.au/warwick_taylor/family_history/f11.htm

 

    Many deeds of terror’: Windschuttle and Musquito

    Naomi Parry

    http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/lab/85/parry.html

     

    • THE HISTORY OF MATT

    http://thehistoryofmatt.blogspot.com/2008/05/ewers-in-colonial-nsw.html

    http://genuki.cs.ncl.ac.uk/DEV/DevonFHS/FamHistorian.html

     

    • STATE LIBRARY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

    http://www.slwa.wa.gov.au/index.html

     

    • KINSELLA FAMILY TREE

    http://www.nkmphotography.com/family/kinsella.html

     

    • JESSE UPTON of WINDSOR NSW 1806 – 1873

    http://www.familytreecircles.com/journal_8533.html

     

      Emmeline Ann Susannah GAUDRY1

      also known as Emaline Ann GAUDRY

      24th May 18141 – 31st Jan 18861

    http://www.users.on.net/~moore/Moore/indiI09426.html

     

     

      Joseph Douglass 1782-1865: First Settler at Kurrajong Heights NSW

       

    http://members.pcug.org.au/~pdownes/douglass/index.htm

     

    • SIMEON LORD’S CHILDREN

     

    http://belindacohen.tripod.com/lordfamily/simeonschildren.html

     

    • BERKSHIRE FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY

    http://www.berksfhs.org.uk/index.htm

     

      NEWCASTLE FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY INC
      New South Wales, Australia

      http://www.nfhs.org.au/NFHSConvictResources.html

       

        Zoological Catalogue of Australia

        By Gary C. B. Poore, James K. Lowry, Australia

      • The compilation of the Zoological Catalogue of Australia is conducted under the auspices of the Australian Biological Resources Study [Canberra

       

        The Blue Mountains

        http://www.bluemts.com.au/tourist/about/history-detail.asp

        A Remarkable Road

        In 1814, William Cox, an extraordinary engineer, assembled a team of thirty convicts and eight guards to build a road across the Blue Mountains.

        Starting at Emu Plains on the 18th July 1814, in just four months the team had completed a road covering a distance of 47 miles to Mount York.

        In just six months, Cox had crossed the Blue Mountains with a road of one hundred and one miles all the way to Bathurst. (The Bathurst Road).

       

      http://iccs.arts.utas.edu.au/data/convictmaids.html

      REV RICHARD HILL IN 1821

      http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1089431

      Sydney, March 17.-On Thursday morning last, the 15th instant, a most interesting ceremony took place at Parramatta ;-the marriage, by special licence, by the Rev. Richard Hill, Secretary to the Native Institution, of two native young men, viz. Michael Yarringguy. a native constable at Richmond, and Robert Narringguy, son to Creek Jemmy, to two of the girls of the Native Institution, viz. Polly –, and Betty Fulton. The ceremony was attended by the rest of the children, and two of the Committee gave the girls away. Shortly after the marriage the two couples set off with the Deputy Surveyor General, to have their respective farms measured, granted to them by His Excellency, the Patron of the Institution ; where, in a short time, comfortable huts will be erected for them, furnished with the necessary furniture, stock, and farming utensils-the whole provided at the expense of Government

      The Perth Gazette and Western Australian Journal, Saturday 16 May 1840, page 2, 3

      http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article638700

       

      Mr. Berry said, that at
      Shoalhaven the blacks have a dread of evil
      spirits, arid have some idea of the transmigra-
      tion of souls. they think that they are turned
      into fishes, and in that state they can look
      after their descendants ; when porpoises have
      been rolling up the river, he has been told by
      the blacks that they were old chiefs, and one
      time he gave very great offence by shooting
      at one of them : at Illawarra a black told
      him that one time when there was a great
      scarcity of provisions, He went to bed very
      hungry, and in his sleep his father appeared
      to him in a vision, and told him that if he
      Went to a particular place in the morning, he
      would find something to eat, and upon going
      there he found a whale which had been
      driven ashore, and upon which he fared
      sumptuously, and the way in which the black
      accounted for this was, that his father had
      assumed the form of a swordfish, and driven
      the whale ashore for him.-Launceston Advertiser.