Category Archives: BOUGHS AND BRANCHES- THE FAMILY TREES

ROSE LORRAINE BENNETT

SEE ALSO HENRY KENDALL THE MAN AND THE MYTHS BY MICHAEL ACKLAND.

 

 

JOHN HENNIKER HEATON who married ROSE LORRAINE BENNETT in 1873 and went on to bring the penny stamp into service.

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FIRST LETTER WITH PENNY STAMP TO AUSTRALIA

IMAGES FROM THE LETTERS OF JOHN HENNIKER HEATON ON INTERNET ARCHIVE

http://www.archive.org/stream/lifelettersofsir00portiala

Dedicated to the dear mother who was ROSE LORRAINE, Henry’s “first love”.

rose lorraine POEM : HENRY KENDALL by his Mother.

Then came to his heart a great first love

Which could never be conquered by time;

Hence his muse was oft draped in sadness,

And she wore it oft times in his rhyme.

A first disappointment is bitter,

And may bring in its turn many woes;

Though it seems but a trifling matter

To be baulked in just plucking a rose.

But pride with its wing covered over

The vulture that tore at his breast,

None knew what it was but the writer;

It was a sealed book to the rest.

Kiama Independent, Oct 16, 1883

Rose “Lorraine”

By Henry Kendall

4/18/1839-8/1/1882


Sweet water-moons, blown into lights
         Of flying gold on pool and creek,
And many sounds and many sights
         Of younger days are back this week.
I cannot say I sought to face
         Or greatly cared to cross again
The subtle spirit of the place
         Whose life is mixed with Rose Lorraine.
What though her voice rings clearly through
         A nightly dream I gladly keep,
No wish have I to start anew
         Heart fountains that have ceased to leap.
Here, face to face with different days,
         And later things that plead for love,
It would be worse than wrong to raise
         A phantom far too vain to move.
But, Rose Lorraine — ah! Rose Lorraine,
         I’ll whisper now, where no one hears —
If you should chance to meet again
         The man you kissed in soft, dead years,
Just say for once “He suffered much,”
         And add to this “His fate was worst
Because of me, my voice, my touch” —
         There is no passion like the first!
If I that breathe your slow sweet name,
         As one breathes low notes on a flute,
Have vext your peace with word of blame,
         The phrase is dead — the lips are mute.
Yet when I turn towards the wall,
         In stormy nights, in times of rain,
I often wish you could recall
         Your tender speeches, Rose Lorraine.
Because, you see, I thought them true,
         And did not count you self-deceived,
And gave myself in all to you,
         And looked on Love as Life achieved.
Then came the bitter, sudden change,
         The fastened lips, the dumb despair:
The first few weeks were very strange,
         And long, and sad, and hard to bear.
No woman lives with power to burst
         My passion’s bonds, and set me free;
For Rose is last where Rose was first,
         And only Rose is fair to me.

 

The faintest memory of her face,
         The wilful face that hurt me so,
Is followed by a fiery trace
         That Rose Lorraine must never know.
I keep a faded ribbon string
         You used to wear about your throat;
And of this pale, this perished thing,
         I think I know the threads by rote.
God help such love! To touch your hand,
         To loiter where your feet might fall,
You marvellous girl, my soul would stand
         The worst of hell — its fires and all!

rose lorraine in later years
ROSE AS LADY HENNIKER HEATON

ILLAWARRA IN THE 1830S AND 1840S

 

From the Sydney Gazettes of the late 1830s and early 1840s, there appears to be a period of land sales in Balgownie and Fairy Meadow. At this stage, research is indicating that William and Mary McNally had 50 acres of land each at Fairy Meadow or Fernhill. Unfortunately, some of this information comes from unexplained sources and/or from Mrs Hamilton-Grey with familiarly emotive deductions. Nevertheless there is enough legitimate evidence to suggest that there were adjoining grants belonging to William McNally and James and Mary(McNally) Martin which were acquired in 1830. There is a later suggestion that in app 1840, James Martin sold the grant of 50 acres which had been either his and Mary’s or Mary’s alone and vanished then without further record. It is at this time that Dr Cox appears in the story and Patrick McNally is listed as his tenant. Be that as it may, here are some aspects of the situation in the Illawarra in the 1830s and 1840s. Background again.

FROM MR ALICK OSBORNE SURGEON ROYAL NAVY

Preston Chronicle (Preston, England), Saturday, October 5, 1833; Issue 1101.


Preston Chronicle (Preston, England), Saturday, October 5, 1833; Issue 1101

ON 25 JUNE 1829, Sydney Gazettte and NSW Advertiser –

Twenty pounds Reward was advertised WITH A TICKET OF LEAVE – to anyone who lodged the following in gaol or gave information leading to their arrests.

The felons were two black natives BROGER and GEORGE MURPHY. They were suspected of being involved in the murder of  JOHN RIVETTS and were at large and committing various depredations in the ILLAWARRA DISTRICT.

_____________________

Freeman’s Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin, Ireland), Friday, July 19, 1839

On the 23 January 1839  a son was born to the lady of Captain Raitt 80 Regiment at the ILLAWARRA STOCKADE.

____________________________

THE MCNALLYS being Irish Catholic;

CATHOLICS Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin, Ireland), Monday, January 27, 1840

____________________

In the Illawarra: 1830, JOHN WYLLIE had a grant of 4000 acres bounded on the south by his own land on the north by a chain of hills and on the east by Mrs Jenkins.

________________________

 

IMPOUNDED, at Illawarra, on the 2d of December, 1829, one red and white Cow, white tail, snail horns, branded on the near hip IS. If not owned within fourteen days from this date, will be sold at the Pound, to defray expenses.

By Order of the Resident Magistrate, JAMES PIERCE, Poundkeeper. Wollongong, Jan. 8, 1830. [12s.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2194289

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 14 January 1830,

 

RATIONS FOR TROOPS AND MOUNTED POLICE STATIONED AT WOLLONGONG OR AT ANY OTHER DISTRICT OF ILLAWARRA. NOVEMBER 1829

daily for each soldier

1lb of bread or biscuit

or; 14 2-7 oz flour from which 20 per cent has been deducted in Bran and Pollard

and; 1lb fresh or salt beef

women one half and children one quarter of the above.

daily for each horse

POEM : HENRY KENDALL by his MOTHER

REFERENCE POINTS WITHIN THE POEM. 

HENRY KENDALL

(By his mother)

1 He was born at the foot of the mountain,

2 He was taught his first letters in sand;

3 His companions – mimosas and gum trees –

4 And the beautiful birds of the land.

5 To his ear the wild scream of the curlew

6 Was sweeter than sweetest of fruits;

7 And the silvery tinkling of bell birds,

8 More soothing than ladies’ fine lutes.

________________________________

SO far we have Henry established under Pigeon House Mountain at birth.

 

bellbird2

BELLBIRD

 

 

 

curlew2

CURLEW

3 – Mimosa seems remarkably widespread on the South Coast of NSW. I thought it were an entirely different plant but now find it another name for plants with which I am familiar.

mimosaMimosa (1)

Best I also locate an image of some gum trees for those of you who haven’t had a gum tree as a companion.

gum treeill-lgw-eec

 

 

 

 

 

 

VOYAGE UP THE CLARENCE RIVER

GRAFTON MAY 08 013

I include this prose piece from Henry Kendall because it describes the trip up the Clarence. It would seem that this is a description of the Kendall arrival there in the late 1840s following Basil Kendall’s conviction for forgery. Details to be checked later.  Having been twice to the Clarence this year, I am interested in the evocations of this piece.

FROM MRS HAMILTON-GREY

Kendall’s prose description of the Clarence was written at a date not known. We have it from a periodical giving it as from ‘ a manuscript in the possession of Miss Evangeline Moore, of Marrickville, whose father J Sheridan Moore, Editor of a Sydney Magazine, etc. etc was Kendall’s first friend as a young man, to his ambition of being a poet:-

from the GRAFTON INDEPENDENT

VOYAGE UP THE CLARENCE RIVER

 

VOYAGE CLARE 1

VOAYGE CLARE PAGE 2

VOYAGE CLARE PAGE 3  

VOYAGE CLARE 2

VOYAGE CLARE 3 

 

Acknowledged with thanks. TG.

A LETTER FROM JANE

The letter is from one of Mrs Hamilton-Grey’s books. She says that it is from JANE, the eldest daughter of Basil and Melinda who is named on Melinda’s death certificate. Jane was a teacher and is said to have worked with Caroline Chisholm at one time. She was born CHRISTINA JANE in 1842 and lived till 1903 when she died in the Granville District of Sydney.The letter appeals to me partially due to its being the only one we have found and also because of the poignant mention of her mother who receives a ‘bad press’ from Henry and other recountants.

WRITTEN FROM PITT-STREET TO A NIECE ( IF this is a blood niece then it would be the daughter of either Henry or Edith Emily. Mary Josephine is already dead by this time and therefore  is not the niece’s ‘mother’ to whom Jane refers in the letter. Basil Edward died without marriage or children that we know of. It is more likely to be Emily than Henry’s widow Charlotte due to the unhappy connections of the family with her. There is also a possibility of the niece not being “niece” in the technical sense of that word. However, Jane writes the following with affection.)

2 August 1895

My Dear ____________,

    I was much pleased to get your long letter; indeed it made up for your mother’s two or three lines,although they are always welcome. I am glad you are soon to be settled in life, and hope you may be happy. In most cases it depends on ourselves whether we are happy or miserable. We make our own little world, for either good or evil. Commence your married life as you intend to end it. Meet one another halfway and all will be well.  I am glad , for your sake,  that your “Boy” is a temperance man, but there are other Sins besides Drunkenness. I had a letter from Mr Simpson last week. He never forgets you and your mother. I am going to write to him this week and will not forget to tell him of your engagement, etc. He is quite well, his letters are a comfort to me, so cheerful and consoling. You do not seem to be in a hurry to get married;and your ‘love’ does not seem very “hot”; but I think you will always be better for that;from what I have read about “hot love” it soon gets cold. You must know ( or your mother will tell you ) I was never in love myself except with my dear old mother – so that I cannot give you any points about love; but write and tell me about all your affairs. I am much interested. Wishing you all happiness and with love to your mother, believe me,

Your affectionate

Aunt Jane.

 

woman_readin_24755_md1892

Representational graphic only. This is NOT Jane Kendall. Courtesy of ETC FLORIDA

 

 

http://www.myheritage.com/site-29770641/melinda-mcnally-kendall-web-site

Thanks to TG for passing on extensive photocopies of information.

POEM: HENRY KENDALL BY HIS MOTHER

REFERENCE POINTS WITHIN THE POEM.

(Kiama Independent, Oct 16, 1883)

HENRY KENDALL

(By his mother)

rgncmpuj

1. He was born at the foot of the mountain,

WHAT MOUNTAIN ? The South Coast NSW is a dim memory to me. My apologies to Milton people and YatteYatta people. Lets see what mountain Henry and Basil were born under.  Peter has visited Kendall Dale and has the block of land on which Melinda and Basil lived pointed out to him. He did not at that time notice the Mountains, so he says. What mountain says he ?  He does tell me that the twin’s birthplace is the property Kirmington next door to what is now KENDALL DALLE at Yatteyatta .

Following the death of THOMAS KENDALL in 1832 and the newly found ( new to me ) criminality of Basil O ( Henry’s father as opposed to Basil E his twin brother) Melinda and Basil ( apparently) retreated with the eldest brother THOMAS SURFLEET, the matriarch JANE QUICKFALL KENDALL and families to live in the County of St Vincent at Nolla Dolla.

from Marjorie Kendall’s KISSIN’ COUSINS – Basil and Melinda settled on part of the land granted originally to THOMAS KENDALL. Their settler’s hut was built on YAKUNGARRAH CREEK ( marked as CEDAR CREEK on Rev Kendall’s map)  

Their twin sons THOMAS HENRY KENDALL ( HENRY) AND BASIL EDWARD KENDALL were born April 18 1849 at MANDNAL .

There were 8 children in the then un-named Parish. The Rev McFie paid an 1840 visit to the District and baptised and took the details of the 8 children including the twins. Melinda is listed in the Rev McFie’s baptismal records as MILLINDA MCALLAN.  Christina Jane was born in 1842 and baptised by the minister for Camden and Wollongong and the other children were born in Sydney.  

Methinks she means the Pigeon House Mountain.

ALSO known by its original name of Didhol or Woman’s Breast from it shape.

pigeon house

IMAGE FROM  The original world nomad  on  http://www.worldnomads.com/

Probably not mine to use but I am desperate and acknowledge this fine blog. This is PIGEON HOUSE MOUNTAIN across JERVIS BAY. Follow the links below to sites on Pigeon Mountain and the Buddawang Mountains. 

  • Didhol (Pigeon House Mountain)

 

 

 

 

 

2. He was taught his first letters in sand
In which sand and where. It is presumed  that the KENDALLS remained in Kirmington and Milton.
http://www.southcoast.com.au/mimosa/ MIMOSA HILL COTTAGES