Category Archives: MCNALLY ELIZA

ALBERT WHITEHOUSE

tree_30034_md

As we know, BASIL KENDALL, husband of MELINDA, was brought before the courts over a series of forgeries and other activities of that nature. First records we have found are 1837 and the last was 1847. To date, we haven’t identified the consequences of his trials. In 1848, he was sentenced to 2 years in Parramatta Gaol but as to whether that was served, we haven’t found the records. He was however on the Clarence River very shortly after his trial, dying there in 1852.

In the Gazettes of1837 ( a full decade earlier) Basil is mentioned a number of times in connection with crimes in collaboration with a young Mr Berry against BARKER’s Mill. Following this period, Basil is relocated in ULLADULLLA with his Melinda and the twins, Basil E and Henry, are born at Kirmington in 1839.

I mention this in connection with Albert Whitehouse – musings (as Louise calls them) entirely. Said Albert is accused of forgery in Pitt-street in 1833. In 1835, Basil and Melinda marry in Sydney so they are contemporaneous. If this ALBERT is indeed the partner of ELIZA ( Melinda’s older sister),there could well be a connection between Basil and Albert. I am suggesting that due to the common nature of the crimes, places of residence and McNally relationships.

Albert and one other of the accused in his case managed to evade conviction due to lack of evidence but the Judge recommended that they be sent away – ‘ removed to a distant part of the colony where they could not exercise that ingenuity for which it appears they had been transported to this colony and beyond the reach of temptation.’ 

In the unlikely event that this Albert is not the one connected to Eliza McNally,nevertheless the recommendation of the Judge reinforces the idea that Basil might well have escaped prison but been sent to a place where he might escape temptation.

  • in the 1830s south to the remote ULLADULLA with his older brother and family.
  • in the 1840s to the Land beyond the Boundaries of the CLARENCE RIVER. n.b. Hindmarshes were also on Clarence at that time.

The SYDNEY GAZETTE AND NSW ADVERTISER of SATURDAY JUNE 29 1833.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2212662

The accused in 1833 are ALBERT WHITEHOUSE,THOMAS BUCKLER and ROBERT LORMER.  They were concerned in FABRICATING and UTTERING forgeries on the BANK OF NSW. The notes had been made on a lithographic press.

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ELIZA MCNALLY

In the last month, 2 descendants of ELIZA have contacted us. Louise, who is related through EMELIA BOLLARD has forwarded this baptismal certificate and has give me permission to place her musings on the site. She is happy that it might help someone else researching as we are.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS WITH THANKS.

whitehouse

FROM LOUISE

Bollard Family

Thomas Bollard (sometimes spelt Ballard) lived at Hardwick Yass in 1850 when he married Emma Whitehouse who also lived at Hardwick. Hardwick was one of three early historic properties established in the early 1800’s, Cooma Cottage, Douro and Hardwicke, by Henry and Cornelius O’Brien.

Henry O’Brien had Hardwick between 1837 and 1852 and during that time helped to save the Australian wool industry from bankruptcy. English demand for wool had dropped so prices plummeted, Henry developed melt down works on Hardwick designed to boil down sheep for tallow, which was sold to England and use for making gunpowder. It is believed that Hardwick is the original route that Hume and Hovell took through that area.

Emma and Thomas both appeared to be working there at the time of their marriage in 1850.

They were married in the Presbyterian Church.

Ellen…1851, John…1854, Thomas …1856, Mary…1859, William…1862, James (Joseph James)…1869, Patrick…1873, 2 other males.

Not much known about Thomas except he was born in Ireland and was about 55 in 1862 when William was born. He went to the Araluen goldfields early in their marriage. After which he worked as a manager of Middlingbank Station near Cooma. After this they moved to Molonglo Station where Thomas worked. It was during this time that the family encountered the Clarke Brothers Bushranger gang, Emma several times by herself with the children.

Their son Jack (probably John)  was speared and boomeranged at Coopers Creek, when he was about 24. He went to Northern Queensland as a stockman and the family were never able to discover what had happened to him, but presumed he had been killed by aborigines.

Emma was 30 when William Albert was born in 1862. At the time of her death on the 31st July 1912, she was living with her son James, at 61 Buckland St Chippendale Sydney.

James indicated that her parents names were James Whitehouse and Bridget McNally, but on tracing records it seems feasible that he didn’t know their Christian names , or there was a mix-up on the form , as his name was James and his wife’s was Bridget. It appears more than likely that Emma (he spelt it Amelia) was actually Elizabeth Emelia Whitehouse born at The Sand Hills (later Surrey Hills) in Sydney and baptised on 25th July 1833 at St Mary’s Cathedral, Sydney.

Her parents were recorded as Albert Whitehouse (printer) and Elizabeth McNally.

Emma is easily adapted from Emelia.

Family vocal history has always indicated that there was a connection with Henry Kendall, it is most likely that Emma’s mother , Elizabeth was a sister of Melinda McNally who married Basil Kendall and subsequently had a son Henry Kendall, the poet. This made Emma his first cousin.

There was no ‘Bridget’ McNally in that family and all other sisters have been accounted for, so this adds weight to the family vocal history and the evidence pointing to Emma’s parents being Albert and Elizabeth (known as Eliza). The ship she came to Australia with the Mcnally Family in 1814 was the Broxbornebury, but on the Baptism cert for Emma it says ship’ 5 Islands’, this is a mystery, but no record of a ship of that name appears to have existed. It could have been the journey they came on as the Broxenbornbury did pass islands and pick up some stranded people, and it is not unlikely that a child of ten would mix up the name of a ship later on. Her parents were Patrick McNally and Judith Kilfroy McDermott, he was convicted for desertion from the 100thregiment whilst serving in Canada and sent out for life.

Albert was a convict, convicted and sentenced for life at Worcester on the 8/3/1828 and sent on the ship Eliza. Records in the Sydney gazette of mid 1833 show an Albert Whitehouse, printer up on charges of forgery. He got off, due to lack of evidence, but others where charged, at the time he worked for a lithographer ( Henry Allen) in Pitt St as a printer. He was described as an artist on Emma’s death certificate, and a printer on her baptism certificate.

A comment was made in the court of being sent out for inappropriate use of printing skills.

Records show that an Albert Whitehouse died in 1833, it hasn’t been confirmed that that was him, but it seems a strange coincidence that Emma was baptised in July 1833 after having been born in 1831. Maybe he died and Elizabeth then baptised her a catholic. There is no record of any other children born to them.

There is a record of an Elizabeth Whitehouse death in 1857 at age 68 in Sydney, and also an Elizabeth Whitehouse appears on the 1841 census living at Surrey hills. Not yet proven that this was Emma’s mother but, Emma was born at the Sand Hills which later became part of Surrey Hills. To date no marriage record for Albert and Elizabeth has been found.

Another coincidence is that Emma and Thomas’s son James was also involved in the printing business, being a compositor. Moya Britten (William Bollard’s granddaughter, James’s grand niece) remembers James coming to visit her grandparents, at the Captains Flat Store, with all his newspaper friends.  William would take them to the river on fishing trips, leaving Bedelia to mind the store.  She also has vivid memories of visiting James when she was a child when they lived in Stanmore, after they moved from Chippendale. She can recall the smell of gas from cooking and perhaps lights etc of that area. She was terrified of a lady in the street who would go out into her front yard in her night dress.

James served in the 1st Pioneer Battalion, 5th Reinforcement, from Oct 1915 to July 1917 at the Western Front from August 1916 to July 1917.

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MENTION OF THE TERM 5 ISLANDS

http://www.walkabout.com.au/locations/NSWWollongong.shtml

 

The Five Islands was the name given to the Illawarra region by the explorers of the late 1700’s and early 1800’s.The earliest reference to this has been traced to Bass (of Bass and Flinders fame) Journal in the Whaleboat.

IN THIS YEAR : 1814 ; SYDNEY GAZETTE SATURDAY 30 JULY

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628955

IN THIS YEAR : 1814 ; SYDNEY GAZETTE SATURDAY 30 JULY

JEOFFREY H BENT Esq arrived on the 28th July to be Judge of the SUPREME COURT of JUDICATURE. This court had been recently established for the Territory of New South Wales. As we know, Judge Bent had come per the BROXBORNEBURY. (He kept a diary of the voyage which is available for reading at NLA but which I do not have access to much as I would like to.)

On the 30th July the Broxbornebury was at anchor in Sydney Cove. Judge Bent was to land in the forenoon of the 30th and to be greeted with a 13 Gun salute from Dawe’s Battery. This was a command of his Excellency the Governor ( LACHLAN MACQUARIE) and H C ANTILL was major of Brigade.

Under GOVERNMENT AND GENERAL ORDERS from HEAD QUARTERS, GOVERNMENT HOUSE, SYDNEY came this mention of the SURRY.

“ The male convict transport , SURRY, which arrived in this harbour from England on the 28th instant, having brought a malignant fever of a very infectious nature of which the Master ,first Mate, and forty other men have died during the voyage, previous to the arrival of the ship in this port; His Excellency the GOVERNOR had deemed it expedient to use every possible precaution to prevent the danger of the Contagion extending from her to the population of the Colony; and with this view he has given orders to institute the most rigid Quarantine Regulations in respect to the Ship herself and all Persons on board her until such time as the Fever has entirely subsided and the People now infected are recovered,

It is therefore the Governor’s most positive Orders that no Persons whatsoever ( the Medical Quarantine Officers and their Attendants excepted) shall have any intercourse or Communication of any sort with said Ship or the Persons now on board her until such Time as she is relieved from Quarantine which will be announced in Public Orders; and the Governor further directs and commands that no Person shall visit or have any intercourse whatever with the Military Detachment, Sailors and Convicts who are about to be landed from the said Ship on the North Shore of Port Jackson; where they are to remain encamped under strict Quarantine Regulations until further orders:- There will be a Guard on board the Ship Surry and also on the North Shore; to enforce these Orders; and any Person detected in attempting to act in Disobedience of them will be confined and most severely punished”

By order of his Excellency,

The Governor.

J T CAMPBELL Secretary.

The Governor was greatly agitated in the matter of the runaways and Bushrangers . He directed that any person known to be harbouring them or holding intercourse with them would forfeit EVERY INDULGENCE on the part of the Government. They would also be PUNISHED “with the utmost rigour of the law”.

The Governor also reflected ‘with the greatest abhorrence’ on the unparalleled depravity of DENNIS DONOVAN. Donovan had been recently executed. The Governor was horrified that Dennis, instead of repenting and praying to his ‘offended creator’ went out of his world ‘protesting in the most solemn manner his total innocence of the murders of the two unfortunate men, JENKINS and EDWARDS at the Parramatta Turnpike. Hmmm! Two innocent men had apparently been accused of the crimes and almost met an early end on the Gallows –the Governor considered that Dennis Donovan from ‘detestible malignity to his fellow creatures and to life itself’ would not confess even at the cost of the two innocent men’s lives

(THE DETAILED ARTICLES AS WRITTEN AT THE TIME CAN BE SEEN IN NATIONAL LIBRARY AUSTRALIA ONLINE HISTORIC NEWSPAPERS – http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628955)

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AND FROM THE BROXBORNEBURY:

THIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE TO EVERY PERSON THAT CAPTAIN THOMAS PITCHER OF HIS MAJESTY’S HIRED STORE-SHIP BROXBORNEBURY, WILL NOT PAY OR CAUSE TO BE PAID ANY DEBTS THAT THE SEAMEN OR ANY OTHER PERSON UNDER HIS COMMAND MAY CONTRACT WITHIN THE COLONY OF NEW SOUTH WALES.

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http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/go/hsie/background-sheets/tracing-the-history-of-citizenship-and-rights-for-indigenous-people/

IN THIS YEAR 1814: WEBSITES OF INTEREST

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628955

 

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WEBSITES OF INTEREST:

MACQUARIE ROOM DATABASES MACQUARIE UNIVERSITY SYDNEY

http://www.lib.mq.edu.au/databases/

  • William Temple (1779 – 1839)

http://www.lib.mq.edu.au/lmr/temple.html

    Track the history

     

    The history of the separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children

    from their families

     

    Francis Murphy

http://members.southernphone.com.au/warwick_taylor/family_history/f11.htm

 

    Many deeds of terror’: Windschuttle and Musquito

    Naomi Parry

    http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/lab/85/parry.html

     

    • THE HISTORY OF MATT

    http://thehistoryofmatt.blogspot.com/2008/05/ewers-in-colonial-nsw.html

    http://genuki.cs.ncl.ac.uk/DEV/DevonFHS/FamHistorian.html

     

    • STATE LIBRARY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

    http://www.slwa.wa.gov.au/index.html

     

    • KINSELLA FAMILY TREE

    http://www.nkmphotography.com/family/kinsella.html

     

    • JESSE UPTON of WINDSOR NSW 1806 – 1873

    http://www.familytreecircles.com/journal_8533.html

     

      Emmeline Ann Susannah GAUDRY1

      also known as Emaline Ann GAUDRY

      24th May 18141 – 31st Jan 18861

    http://www.users.on.net/~moore/Moore/indiI09426.html

     

     

      Joseph Douglass 1782-1865: First Settler at Kurrajong Heights NSW

       

    http://members.pcug.org.au/~pdownes/douglass/index.htm

     

    • SIMEON LORD’S CHILDREN

     

    http://belindacohen.tripod.com/lordfamily/simeonschildren.html

     

    • BERKSHIRE FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY

    http://www.berksfhs.org.uk/index.htm

     

      NEWCASTLE FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY INC
      New South Wales, Australia

      http://www.nfhs.org.au/NFHSConvictResources.html

       

        Zoological Catalogue of Australia

        By Gary C. B. Poore, James K. Lowry, Australia

      • The compilation of the Zoological Catalogue of Australia is conducted under the auspices of the Australian Biological Resources Study [Canberra

       

        The Blue Mountains

        http://www.bluemts.com.au/tourist/about/history-detail.asp

        A Remarkable Road

        In 1814, William Cox, an extraordinary engineer, assembled a team of thirty convicts and eight guards to build a road across the Blue Mountains.

        Starting at Emu Plains on the 18th July 1814, in just four months the team had completed a road covering a distance of 47 miles to Mount York.

        In just six months, Cox had crossed the Blue Mountains with a road of one hundred and one miles all the way to Bathurst. (The Bathurst Road).

       

      http://iccs.arts.utas.edu.au/data/convictmaids.html

      IN THIS YEAR : 1814 . THE SHIPS HAVE DOCKED

      Jeffrey H Bent had arrived on the Broxbornebury along with Judith and the children on July 28 1814. The Broxbornebury carried some very prestigious people. Judith is not likely to have been one of them with her husband a convict.

      Known to have been on the Broxbornebury in the ” upper classes “were :

      BARBER, George (c1795-1844) came free to reunite with his mother in Sydney in 1814, when he travelled on the Broxbornebury. His mother’s second husband , Charles Throsby was a surgeon and Magistrate.

      SIR JOHN JAMIESON.

      J.H BENT. MAGISTRATE OF THE SUPREME COURT

      JOHN HORSLEY.

      MRS MARY GREENWAY

      GEORGE WILLIAMS

      JOHN STILLWELL

      ____________________

      It seems that nine of the convicts on the Surrey I had free wives on the Broxbornebury most with children. That means that Judith travelled for months in close company with them. Through deaths, births, illnesses and all the attending circumstances of such a voyage. The voyage lasted 5 months and app 200 people were on board.

      For me, I am now wondering what connections might have continued between the McNallys and the other Voyagers once they had arrived in NSW. Most of the Female convicts were sent to the FEMALE FACTORY at PARRAMATTA.

      (This is also the year in which John READY came as convict on THE THREE BEES and was assigned to GOVERNMENT HOUSE WINDSOR where his mother, JOHANNAH, was HOUSEKEEPER. JOHANNAH had been transported on the ARCHDUKE CHARLES in 1812.  At the same time ANN MORAN and JOHN CURTIS were in the PARRAMATTA area. )

      http://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/?s=parramatta

      FREE WOMEN WITH CHILDREN WHOSE HUSBANDS WERE ON THE SURRY I OR HAD COME ON OTHER SHIPS AS CONVICTS.

      I am listing them as a group on the presumption that they would have shared quarters or been in very close contact and that they would have had at least slightly different conditions from the convict women.

      The CROSS and BOGG families were on board and

      JANE DAVIS and her children.

      ANN THOMPSON and son WILLIAM. The Pitt Town connection comes in here. Ann’s husband who was an educated convict set up a school at Pitt Town – and Ann joined him on her arrival in 1814.

      JOSEPH FERNANCE AND HIS MOTHER MARY. Mary and her husband John had a large number of children once they were reunited and five of these children were born in PITT TOWN as was Melinda.

      • ANNE GAINS and her child JANE. Her husband died on the SURREY I.

      MRS GREENAWAY and 3 children.

      • HANNAH HINSHAW ( Henshal/Henshaw) and children. the HINSHAWS were living in KENT STREET in the 1828 Muster ( as were the MacNallys) Husband JOHN on SURREY I.

      The GREGORY family who travelled with a convicted mother. In later year Mr Bogg, shoemaker, apprentices one of the Gregory boys. Following the death of their mother and the return to England of their father the Gregory Boys were placed in the MALE ORPHAN SCHOOL- but in 1826, Mr Bogg takes on George. Young Edward is apprenticed to the Institute of Shoemakers, perhaps with some influence from Mr Bogg. Mr Gregory was on the SURREY I as a free settler.

      (These are the kind of connections I am seeking. A trip of that nature under the circumstances existent in the lives of the Voyagers – What are the later connections ? What bonds formed during the Journey? How did they overlap on the ship and in the Colony ? Of what import were these people in the lives of the McNallys in after years – if any ? )

      ELIZABETH HOWELL and her 3 children.

      • SARAH BLADES. Husband THOMAS on SURRY I.

      MARIA COWAN and her son.

      MARY MCPHERSON and 3 children.

      SUSAN NEWSHAM with 3 children.

      • HANNAH RAE ROBINSON and children. Husband RICHARD on SURREY I.

      ELIZABETH TOFT and children.

      SARAH TOOL and child. With her husband SARAH and family lived at Castlereagh and Windsor and when defeated by farming. they .like the McNallys came into Sydney to live in Kent Street.

      THE WHEELER FAMILY , JANE and children. IN 1828, they were living in Castlereagh street as was Melinda. One of the daughters Maria had married JAMES MORRIS JNR and her sister had married one of the BOGGS.

      • ANN WHITTAKER and her two sons. Her husband THOMAS was on SURRY I with Patrick and in the Colony they went on to run a hotel in the ROCKS.

      ELIZABETH WISE and children

      DOROTHY WOOD and her daughter.

      • MARY WRIGHT whose husband was on the SURRY I.

       

      • SOPHIA KINGSMORE a convict woman later marries JOHN KING from the SURREY I.

      Some of the Broxbornebury voyagers owned or managed hotels in the Colony. An easily accessible meeting place for the Sydneysiders.

      Harriet Horne, one of the convict women, made a second marriage to a Mr Drinkwater and they also were living in Kent St in the 1828 Muster.

      Norah Murphy one of the convict women was living in Kent St in 1825 Muster.

      ANN WILSON married a Mr Hilliard and she died in Kent street in 1839.

      ___________________________________________________________

       

      see also these sites :

       

                http://www.femalefactory.com.au/FFRG/pdfs/D.pdf.

       

       

      Sarah THORNTON, now a convict, arrived Sydney Colony on 28th July, 1814 with two of her children, Sarah and Samuel Jnr (who was born on the sea, dated 23rd June 1814), leaving a kid behind in England. They sailed on the “Broxbornebury” while Samuel THORNTON was abroad on the “Somersetshire” as a free settler, arrived on 16th October on the same year. In the shipping records, Samuel THORNTON was stated as 31 years old free settler.

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Convicts Details

      SMITH, Ann of Southrey

      Alias:  WARDLE, WARDELL

      Age: 31

      Crime: Breaking into the shop of William Holland and stealing 7 pieces of print, a web of Irish linen, 36 handkerchiefs, a part of a web of calico, 3 pairs of women’s cotton hose and sundry other articles

      Place of crime: Southrey

      Court: Assize

      Trial date: 31/07/1813

      Sentence: Death, commuted to life

      Ship: Broxbornebury

      Destination: New South Wales

      Transportation Date: 1814

      Sources Used: Calendar of sentences

      Other Remarks: Single woman

      Document Ref: MISC DEP 560

      http://microsites.lincolnshire.gov.uk/archives/ConvictsResults.asp?court=&destination=&ship=Broxbornebury

       

      ____________________________________________________________________________

      (Elizabeth Hook’s CD Book JOURNEY TO A NEW LIFE , carries many details of the Vessels, Crew, Passengers and their lives in the Colony. ) We purchased this early on and it is valuable and available. Check Google for purchase details. It verifies some of the information we have been locating and, of course,provides much more for those interested in the BROX, the SURREY, the GEORGE HEWITT.

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      NAMES OF CONVICTS ARRIVING IN AUSTRALIA 1811-1813

      http://jamesmc.pinewoodrecords.com.au/bk27.htm

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      Highlights and lowlights in the lives of the convict women of Van Diemen’s Land

      http://www.notoriousstrumpets.com/Strumpets%20page/Highlights.htm

      Louisa Atkins [Broxbornebury] was aged 14 years when transported for larceny.

      Alice Robson [Broxbornebury] was forced to walk the 35 miles from George Town to Launceston wearing a 6¼lb iron collar, as punishment for being a ‘profligate adulteress’

      __________________

      JUDITH MILLARD

      http://www.flamstead-herts.co.uk/mag/apr2001.html

      Judith was delivered, shamed and ironed in an open cart to Northfleet and placed aboard the convict ship BROXBORNEBURY, and with 119 other female prisoners and settlers, sailed on 22 February 1814 in convoy with the SURRY, carrying 200 male convicts and settlers, for Port Jackson.

       

       

       

       

       

      On the 25 May, 1835 Reverend John McGarvie married Edward to Mary Ann Smith at the Scot’s Church in Elizabeth Street, Sydney.

                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Jamison

       

       

        Mary Lawrence, a widow, residing at Sutton Poyntz and late of Melcombe Regis, otherwise called Mary Butt was indicted on 24th March 1813 with feloniously stealing a watch with chain and key, the property of Thomas Courtin, from his dwelling house in Melcombe Regis.

        Mary was aged 22 years when she was tried at the Summer Assizes in August that year and after spending several months in prison, she was transported to Australia for seven years. She left on board the Broxbornebury which arrived in Sydney in July 1814.

         

         

      JANE JONES STILWELL WEBSTER
      1795 -1868

      Jane Jones grew up in the Soho district of London, the daughter of William Jones a glassmaker. She was 4’10 ½” tall, of fair complexion with black hair and hazel eyes. On 16th May 1812 aged 17 she and her friend Ann Rogers aged 15, robbed a public house of 4 loaves of bread, 1lb butter, 5 eggs, 1 fowl, a cheese, silver cutlery, plates, basin, tinder box and the entire till holding 140 pennies, 2,124 halfpennies & 463 farthings. A Beadle and Constable caught them coming home and they were locked up in the Watchhouse. Two months later in the Old Bailey they were found guilty and sentenced to death, but because of their young age the sentence was commuted to transportation to the colonies for life.  READ ON

         

    • http://home.vicnet.net.au/~dcginc/convictsEK.html
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      IN THIS YEAR : 1814

      5ships_30588_md

      AS noted before this is the year in which the McNallys arrived in NSW. Judith was on board the BROXBORNEBURY with Mary, William and Eliza. Patrick on board the SURRY I as a convict. With access to the historic newspapers , I have been able to locate further details of the Colony in the year of their arrival.  Here are some of the stories.

      http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628832

      SYDNEY GAZETTE 12 FEBRUARY 1814.

      The Surry I and Broxbornebury arrived on July 28, 1814. Earlier in the year, Mrs McArthur found it necessary to caution all persons against trespassing upon any part of her grounds. The Grounds were in the vicinity of PARRAMATTA and Mrs Mac was offering a reward due to the destruction which had been caused by trepassers.

      Mr Jenkins ( to whose son Melinda writes the memorial poem many years later) was auctioning a variety of goods. These included a large and valuable collection of BOOKS. He also had some excellent drawing paper,pencils and Paints.

      Several thousand Prime Salted Seal Skins were also being sold. Richard Jones was selling them by Private Contract  but if they didn’t sell that way, they were to be auctioned by Mr Bevan.

      http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628869 In March , 1814, a soldier of the 73d regiment was bit on the hand by a snake. He was out at Windsor. The wound was immediately incised and the poisoned bit taken out – nevertheless the soldier underwent several hours of extreme illness which included a  ” debilitating stupor”.

      Richard Carr , a landholder at Nepean was bitten on the foot in the same week but his fate had not been ascertained by the Gazette at the time of printing. “One of the most dangerous species of the viper tribe” was the description of this snake.

      Snakes it was. One was seen in Mrs Reibey’s warehouse. Right in the city that was. The snake escaped down a small aperture in the floor. Another was seen in the yard of 96 George Street. That one vanished but an old man mixing mortar “felt a severe stroke upon the instep”, looked down, saw a snake and severed its head from it body promptly with his spade.  He didn’t know whether or not he had bitten but suffered no ill effects.

      All this is happening while the McNallys are in England and then on board the ships. The Surry I , as it will turn out is affected by a terrible disease. They have come from Canada at war, through court martial and transportation – and when they reach this end – its likely to be SNAKES !

      The Gazette looked for an explanation of the sudden influx of snakes into the City and came to the conclusion that they were being brought in in the hollow parts of trees coming from the country as fuel. A strong suggestion is made to a) examine the trees carefully and b) keep them stored at a great distance from the ‘frequented parts of inhabited premises”. Good advice to this very day ! In addition, it seems the elderly mortar making gentleman gad thick worsted stockings worn loosely about his ankles. An other good idea !

       

      snake_jpg

      http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628869

      The McNallys are also en route to a country with a very warm climate. The Gazette has some tips for

      “PREVENTION OF THE FATAL EFFECTS OF DRINKING COLD WATER OR COLD LIQUORS OF ANY KIND IN WARM WEATHER OR WHEN HEATED BY EXERCISE OR OTHERWISE”

      Here are some of the lifesaving ideas.

      • Avoid drinking whilst warm
      • Drink only a small quantity at once.
      • Let the liquid remain a small time in the mouth before swallowing it.
      • Wash the hands and face and rince the mouth with cold water before drinking

       

      Should these precautions have been neglected and the effects of drinking cold water are showing, then ” the only remedy to be administered is 60 drops of laudanum in  spirit and water, or warm drink of any kind ”

      _____________________________________

       

      SYDNEY GAZETTE 2 JULY 1814 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628941

      The Rev Henry Fulton:

      (in whose school Charles Tompson Jnr ( Poet) was educated  and who was deeply involved in the incidents of 1822-23 which led to Patrick McNally being gaoled for a time and tried for Pig Stealing prior to removing himself and his family from the Castlereagh area and taking up residence in Kent Street in Sydney proper )

      In July of 1814 Mr Fulton is Chaplin of Castlereagh and Richmond. He advertised that he would be opening his school on 11 July 1814. The School was situated in the Parsonage House. The school was for the “Accommodation of a few young gentlemen not exceeding twelve.”

      The good Rev was planning to teach Latin, Greek Classics, French and English grammatically, Writing and “such parts of the Mathematics both in theory and practice as may suit the taste of the Scholar”.

      This is the dedication Tompson wrote for the Reverend Gentleman in his book WILD NOTES: FROM THE LYRE OF A NATIVE MINSTREL.

      TO THE REV HENRY FULTON

      CASTLEREAGH-HOUSE.

      Dear Sir,

         To you beneath whose kind and fostering tuition I lived the rosy hours of childhood and imbibed those qualities which were erewhile the early promptures of my muse, i respectfully inscribe these buddings of my fancy; considering that, in acting thus, I am but perfomring a small part of that grateful duty I owe you, as my former tutor  with which title your paternal behaviour always blended the joint idea of father and friend.

      Believe me dear Sir

         with the highest respect and veneration

             your obedient and grateful Servant,

                  CHARLES TOMPSON Jnr.

      Clydesdale March 1 1826.

       

      Terms were 50 pounds sterling per annum.

      _______________________________________

      In the Rocks area of Sydney , Richard Archbold had just arrived in the Colony and he, too, was opening a school. In his case he was planning to instruct children of both sexes. A SEMINARY OF INSTRUCTION he called it. No 7 Gloucester Street, The Rocks. Richard proposed to teach READING WRITING AND ARITHMETIC. He offered bookkeeping if required and assured parents that he would pay attention to the MORAL as well as the other “duties of his avocation”.

      Richard also offered and Evening Academy for the improvement of those at a more advanced stage and whose occupations may interfere  with daily attendance. Terms were said to be moderate.