Category Archives: POETRY AND POETS

THE PAST. AN MS POEM BY HENRY KENDALL

HK POEM MS Empire (Sydney, NSW 1850-1875), Thursday 27 September 1860

Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850-1875), Thursday 27 September 1860

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60498986

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SPEED SPEED YE TEMPERANCE SHIP

In response to:

Jane said

January 16, 2011 at 10:56 am e

Do you by any chance know who wrote the poem Speed Speed the temperance ship? I can’t seem to find it anywhere.

Thank you for your time

The New temperance melodist: consisting of glees, songs, and pieces

By Stephen Hubbard   

The song set to music is in this collection by Stephen Hubbard set to Music by LENOX.

On further examination, I tend to think it is sung to the  tune of “Lenox” rather than being written by someone called Lenox. I wonder what LENOX was.

It is also found in a Collection by Marsh in 1841 ( see post below).

Neither claims to have written the lyrics or poem as far as I can see.

FROM HUBBARD’S BOOK. 1859.

THE TEMPERANCE SHIP.

Tune, "Lenox."

1. Speed, speed the temp’rance ship 1 Ye winds fill every sail, Be

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tempest’s fury she outbraves,And hosts of death – less drunkards saves.

The

Speed, speed the temperance ship I

Ye winds fill every sail,
Behold her on the deep,

Outriding every gale,
The tempest’s fury she outbraves,
And hosts of deathless drunkards saves.

Speed, speed the Temperance ship!

Who joins us in the cry ?
Mothers O cease to weep,

Our ship is passing by,
We wish to take you all on board,
A freight of mercy to the Lord.

Speed, speed the Temperance ship!

For her we’ll ever pray,
‘Tis Israel’s God can keep

In safety, night and day ;
On him we’ll evermore depend
Who is the contrite drunkard’s friend.

Speed, speed the Temperance ship!

Ye young and aged shout, Behold her on the deep!

With all her streamers out, Bound for the true tee-total shore, Where streams of death are drank no more.

HUBBARD – TEMPERANCE MELODIST 1852

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Google Books also have the MARSH 1841 words without music.

Temperance hymn book and minstrel: a collection of hymns, songs and odes

By John Marsh

 

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MINOR VICTORIAN POETS AND AUTHORS

http://gerald-massey.org.uk/index.htm

 

GEORGE JACOB HOLYOAKE

“Where debate is forbidden the charlatan is king.”

G. J. Holyoake, from. . . .  The Jubilee History of the Leeds Industrial Co-operative Society

ROCHDALE PIONEERS.

Welcome.  This web site is dedicated to the life and work of the Chartist, poet, author, and free thinker, Gerald Massey, and to comparable poets and authors of his era, a number of whom by their protests were to influence political and social reform in Victorian Britain.  Most have working-class backgrounds. My aim is to resurrect their writing, much of which has for many decades been unavailable outside of national archives and university libraries, and to place it before a wider audience.

 

SOME OF THE FEMALE AUTHORS: 

EMILY FAITHFULL

An independent and independent-minded Victorian, who left a legacy of writings and activity in one of the most controversial issues of her age, the employment of women.

http://gerald-massey.org.uk/faithfull/index.htm

 

ISA CRAIG KNOX

1831-1903)

Victorian social reformer, women’s rights activist,
journalist, poetess and novelist.

 


ISABELLA FYVIE MAYO

ISABELLA FYVIE MAYO is little remembered today, but during the later decades of the 19th century this determined, independent-minded and hard-working woman became a widely published poetess and author, much of her prose output being published ― both in the U.K. and in North America ― under thenom de plume, “EDWARD GARRETT“.  She also  became a speaker on liberal causes, particularly on the themes of religion, pacifism and animal welfare.

 British parallels to Melinda’s lost writing and working class background.

ROCHDALE RIOTS

Thanks to MARK GREGORY’s research, we have been led to a 1795 verse from the ROCHDALE FOOD RIOTS in the UK. This forms the chorus and partial verse of Melinda’s  COLLIER’S STRIKE SONG which is written about an ILLAWARRA COAL STRIKE.

The ROCHDALE  BUROUGH WIDE CULTURAL TRUST WEBSITE informs us that they located the verse on a typewritten piece of paper in their archives which a long ago librarian had typed up. At this time, that’s all the details we have. Mark and his compatriots see an indication of the ongoing thread of working class folklorist tradition extending to Melinda’s song.

Below are some  articles referring to the situation in Rochdale in 1795.

JULY 1795

Whitehall Evening Post (London, England), Saturday, July 11, 1795; Issue 7593

The MORNING POST and FASHIONABLE WORLD of AUGUST 6 1795 reported riots in which three people were killed  by the VOLUNTEERS. The riots continued after the letters had left.

The COURIER AND EVENING GAZETTE of AUGUST 11(LONDON ENGLAND) gave the names and details of the men killed. One was 80 years old and in no way connected with the riots and other by the name of FLETCHER was equally uninvolved. A boy had his arm broken and many more were wounded by the VOLUNTEER FENCIBLES.

FROM THE STAR Star (London, England), Monday, August 24, 1795; Issue 2189.

Star (London, England), Monday, August 24, 1795; Issue 2189.

ROCHDALE AND THE 1795 FOOD RIOTS ON LINK4LIFE

http://www.link4life.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=c.showPage&pageID=310

ROCHDALE RIOTS.

 

Another contemporary verse records the feelings of the working people who were facing wage reductions at a time when bread prices were high.

The masters they are grumbling in country and in town
They want to starve the workers by keeping wages down.
Now in some parts of England the men were standing out
Against a great reduction and they’re right without a doubt.
In this happy country, man is treated like a slave
When the master gets the profit and the worker gets the work.
You’ve no right to be happy, no right to be well fed,
If they drop our wages, they must drop the price of bread.

 

MUDCAT CAFE       http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=118416&messages=4

Discussion on COLLIER’S STRIKE SONG.  WITH MARK GREGORY. 

AND Folklorist Graham Seal writes:

It looks like an adaptation of a song or poem said to be related to the 3rd August 1795 food riot in Rochdale. If so, a good example of the continuity of folk tradition.

COMPARE THE 1795 VERSE WITH MELINDA’S SONG:

The Colliers’ Strike Song
    A Song by Melinda Kendall 1885

    Come all ye jolly colliers, and colliers’ wives as well,
    And listen to my ditty, for the truth I mean to tell;
    It’s of a colliers’ wage dispute, is the burden of my song;
    I mean to cheer you up, if it won’t detain you long.
    For masters they are grumbling, in country and in town,
    They want to starve poor miners, by cutting wages down;
    But if you stick together, and every one be true,
    You are sure to be triumphant  singing cock-a-doodle-doo.

    Chorus:
    For masters they are grumbling, in country and in town,
    They want to starve poor miners, by cutting wages down;
    But if you stick together, and every one be true,
    You are sure to be triumphant  singing cock-a-doodle-doo.

    The miners of Mount Kembla, oh! loudly how they shout
    Against this drop of ten percent, they’re right without a doubt;
    In this happy, glorious country, man is treated like a Turk,
    Where the masters get the profit, and the miners get the work.
    We only want fair wages, we only want fair play,
    We know we ought to have a good dinner every day;
    But what are we to do when the butcher he comes round,
    If we let our masters drop two shillings in the pound.

    Just ask a blessed woman what she is going to do,
    From the present price of wages we cannot save a screw
    With a lot of little children, with pieces, hungry teeth;
    If they drop our wages, they must also drop the price of beef.
    For every woman knows the task she has to meet,
    With a lot of little mouths, and nothing much to eat;
    But it can’t be very different, it’s very plain to tell,
    Where the masters get the oyster, and the miners get the shell.

    I would have you stick together, and have a good go in,
    Be true to one another, and I’m sure you’re bound to win;
    Though money is so valuable  and so is labour, too
    The working man is worth whatever he may do.
    And I hope that every woman will tell her husband too;
    She will do her very best to help him to keep true;
    They will be sure to raise the wine, and make the masters say
    “The devil’s in the women, for they never will give way.”

    Notes

    Published in Illawarra Mercury, October 3, 1885

 

MARK GREGORY AND THE UNION SONGS

http://unionsong.com/

I found MARK GREGORY’s UNION SONGS a good while back and with my Belmore Railway and carpentry background I identified strongly and quickly. Mark has now contacted us and added a new dimension to Melinda’s work with specific focus on her working class fire and passion.

This is what Mark says as he opens his site:

More than 640 songs and poems, over 260 Authors

Call them rebel songs, slave songs, songs of freedom, work songs, songs of dissent, songs of struggle, protest songs, liberation songs, labour songs, labor songs, workers songs, industrial folk songs, environmental songs, songs of equality, peace songs.

For over two centuries working people across the world have built trade unions. This site documents the songs and poems that they made in the process, union songs. It includes songs and poems that are being written today, as the process of union building continues all around the world.
Such songs are the work of famous poets as well as men and women whose names have been forgotten. They stretch back to ancient times and are being created today.

‘Songs are very strange. Why is a song like Pound A Week Rise – rescued from my personal “scrapheap”, because it was about a miners’ wage claim in 1962 and I did not think it relevant in the 70s, by Dick Gaughan in about 1975 – still recorded by Americans, Australians etc – I always say there is no such thing as an old song because it is new to someone if they have not heard it before.’
Ed Pickford

http://unionsong.com/