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ARALUEN

Illustrated Sydney News (NSW : 1853 – 1872), Friday 16 June 1865

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63512448

araluen Illustrated Sydney News (NSW  1853 - 1872), Friday 16 June 1865

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BACK ON THE BEEJAPORE 1853

FROM TWAS HARD TO DIE FRAE HAME

‘IT WAS HARD TO
DIE FRAE HAME’:
DEATH, GRIEF AND MOURNING AMONG SCOTTISH MIGRANTS TO NEW ZEALAND,
1840 -1890.

 

By
Debra Powell
A Thesis
Submitted to the University of Waikato
in fulfilment of the
requirements for the degree of
Master of Arts
in History
2007

Infectious diseases, chronic illness, accidents at sea, dysentery and diarrhoea, and the debilitating effects of constant seasickness on pregnant women and breast-feeding mothers, all took a toll on passenger numbers. Migrants were not unaware of the risks involved. The loss of babies and infants was considered an inevitable consequence of long seaboard journeys. William Usherwood on board the Beejapore to Sydney in 1853 expressed a common sentiment when he wrote: ‘The … adults are all in good health, we have lost several children but this was quite expected, being always the case’.

Outbreaks of typhoid and scarlet fever occurred aboard the clipper ship Collingwood on its journey to New Zealand in 1875. Passenger Thomas Heath wrote about the experience in verse, describing just such a situation which took place after the death of a child travelling in the cabin class:
Again death has been here today about noon,
And took the one child from out the saloon.
Amongst the passengers there he was a great pet,
And those passengers have not got over it yet.
His mother had horror of canvas for a shroud
And wanted her boy to be sent away proud
In a coffin that the carpenter would be asked now to make
So a watery grave would not be his lot, for her own sake.
It would be watertight so the coffin would float.
“Yes,” said she, ‘and then it could be picked up by a boat,
Who would take him to land and bury him there.”
And so put an end to her terrible scare.
So the Captain gave orders to the carpenter brave
To make up a coffin and these were the orders he carefully gave,
The coffin to be made and with sailcloth be covered,
The bottom as well as the rest, lest it be discovered

That holes had been bored in the bottom therein
To let in the water, and that was no sin.
At sunset it was launched well on the wave,
And it floated and comfort to the mother it gave,
When the water got in sometime in the night,
It sank to the bottom and was soon lost to sight.

http://adt.waikato.ac.nz/uploads/approved/adt-uow20070301.143621/public/02whole.pdf

LETTERS IN SAND

A NEW SITE FOR THE things I find which don’t fit into MELINDA KENDALL or LYNNE BELL SANDERS.

LETTERS IN SAND

 1800bookscene

Douglas Adam’s short history of Australia

“Some time around 40,000 years ago, some people arrived in boats from the north. They ate all the available food, and a lot of them died. The ones that survived learned respect for the balance of nature, man’s proper place in the scheme of things, and spiders. They settled in, and spent a lot of the intervening time making up strange stories.
Then, around 200 years ago, Europeans arrived in boats from the north. More accurately, European convicts were sent, with a few deranged and stupid people in charge. They tried to plant their crops in Autumn (failing to take account of the reversal of the seasons when moving from the top half of the planet to the bottom), ate all their food, and a lot of them died.
About then the sheep arrived, and have been treasured ever since. It is interesting to note here that the Europeans always consider themselves vastly superior to any other race they encounter, since they can lie, cheat, steal, and litigate (marks of a civilised culture they say) – whereas all the Aboriginals can do is happily survive being left in the middle of a vast red-hot desert, equipped with a stick.
Eventually, the new lot of people stopped being Europeans on Extended Holiday and became Australians. The changes are subtle, but deep, caused by the mind-stretching expanses of nothingness and eerie quiet, where a person can sit perfectly still and look deep inside themselves to the core of their essence, their reasons for being, and the necessity of checking inside your boots every morning for fatal surprises. They also picked up the most finely tuned sense of irony in the world, and the Aboriginal gift for making up stories. Be warned.”

– Extract from ‘The confusing country’ by Douglas Adams

WE CAME ON ONE WAY TICKETS – ASSISTED BUT UNINVITED. ASSISTED TO LEAVE FROM ONE END AND UNINVITED BY  THE OTHER. THE ELECTRONIC QUILL BRINGS YOU TALES OF TIMES BARELY UNDERSTOOD AND DEEPLY ESSENTIAL IN LETTERS IN SAND. DIP IN YOUR QUILL AND CHOOSE YOUR INK. THESE ARE OUR STORIES.  THE CONVICT AND THE EMIGRANT AND, ON OCCASION , WE HEAR FROM THAT ALIEN FIGURE – THE ONE WHO CAME FREELY.  

vkgc_tre012

THIS IS HOW WE CAME. THIS IS WHAT HAPPENED. THIS IS WHAT WE ARE LIKE NOW.

 

http://electronicquill.wordpress.com/

 

PALMER STREET WOOLLOOMOOLOO

 

WE are now in receipt of some very interesting documents from a time when Melinda was residing in PALMER STREET. 1868 it was.

image-1

HERE WE HAVE HER SIGNATURE ON DOCUMENTS WHICH WE WILL REVEAL AT A LATER DATE.

FOR THE MOMENT – LETS LOOK AT PALMER STREET .


1853 IN PALMER STREET

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article665136

Sudden Death. – About half-past eleven o’clock on Monday night, a Mrs. Short, of
Palmer-street, Woolloomooloo, was found dead
on her sofa by some neighbours. Only a child
about seven or eight months old was in her house
at the time. Her husband was killed about a
year ago. An inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Fitz Roy Hotel on the body of the
aforesaid Marcella Short. It appeared that she
was a young woman who bad for some time past
been unfortunately addicted to drinking. The
jury returned a verdict-Death from natural
causes, but accelerated by habits of intemperance.
-Empire, April 6 1853

1854 IN PALMER STREET

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article695817

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 13 December 1854 Supplement

A SERIOUS ACCIDENT OCCURRED WHEN A BRICKLAYER ON A HOUSE BEING BUILT BY ROGER MURPHY IN PALMER STREET, WAS PRECIPITATED TO THE GROUND WHEN SCAFFOLDING COLLAPSED. HE WAS REPORTED TO BE IN A VERY DANGEROUS STATE.

1854. HOW TO ENSURE THAT THERE IS WATER FOR EVERYBODY.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article696067

HEREIN A PRIVATE LETTER IS PUBLISHED. FROM 33 PALMER STREET – MR PORTUS HAS STUDIED THE WATER PROBLEM AND HAS COME TO A VARIETY OF SOLUTIONS AND WISE USES OF WATER. HE MAKES USE OF IRON SHIP TANKS IN THE COLLECTING OF RAIN WATER.

1855 . NO 96 PALMER STREET .

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article705207

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 22 August 1855 Supplement

AWFULLY SUDDEN DEATH IN PALMER STREET. IT WAS OF A MARRIED FEMALE NAMED MAY ANN MCKENZIE, WIFE OF ONE OF THE NEW POLICE. SHE WISHED TO ACCOMPANY HER HUSBAND WHEN HE WENT OUT AND HE DECLINED. READ THE ARTICLE TO SEE WHAT HAPPENED NEXT ! IT WAS AWFULLY SUDDEN.

1866 – 

THE FOUNDERING OF THE KETCH VICTORY

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1269674

MT JAMES HOGG , LIMEBURNER, OF PALMER STREET WOOLLOOMOOLLOO , OWNED A KETCH CALLED THE VICTORY. IN JUNE 1866 IT FOUNDERED OFF THE HEADS BRINGING A CARGO OF SHELLS BACK FROM BROEKN BAY. ONE OF THE CREW WAS FOUND DEAD IN THE DINGHY. A NAMELESS DUTCHMAN SO HE WAS.

MURDER AND MAYHEM

 

A MISCELLANY OF MURDER AND MAYHEM IN THE 19TH CENTURY IN THE COLONY

 
1803 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625757

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625758

most barbarous and dreadful MURDER

1804 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626080 ATTEMPTED MURDER BY A VILLAIN