Category Archives: FAMILY TREE AND HERITAGE WEBSITE

ELIZA MCNALLY

In the last month, 2 descendants of ELIZA have contacted us. Louise, who is related through EMELIA BOLLARD has forwarded this baptismal certificate and has give me permission to place her musings on the site. She is happy that it might help someone else researching as we are.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS WITH THANKS.

whitehouse

FROM LOUISE

Bollard Family

Thomas Bollard (sometimes spelt Ballard) lived at Hardwick Yass in 1850 when he married Emma Whitehouse who also lived at Hardwick. Hardwick was one of three early historic properties established in the early 1800’s, Cooma Cottage, Douro and Hardwicke, by Henry and Cornelius O’Brien.

Henry O’Brien had Hardwick between 1837 and 1852 and during that time helped to save the Australian wool industry from bankruptcy. English demand for wool had dropped so prices plummeted, Henry developed melt down works on Hardwick designed to boil down sheep for tallow, which was sold to England and use for making gunpowder. It is believed that Hardwick is the original route that Hume and Hovell took through that area.

Emma and Thomas both appeared to be working there at the time of their marriage in 1850.

They were married in the Presbyterian Church.

Ellen…1851, John…1854, Thomas …1856, Mary…1859, William…1862, James (Joseph James)…1869, Patrick…1873, 2 other males.

Not much known about Thomas except he was born in Ireland and was about 55 in 1862 when William was born. He went to the Araluen goldfields early in their marriage. After which he worked as a manager of Middlingbank Station near Cooma. After this they moved to Molonglo Station where Thomas worked. It was during this time that the family encountered the Clarke Brothers Bushranger gang, Emma several times by herself with the children.

Their son Jack (probably John)  was speared and boomeranged at Coopers Creek, when he was about 24. He went to Northern Queensland as a stockman and the family were never able to discover what had happened to him, but presumed he had been killed by aborigines.

Emma was 30 when William Albert was born in 1862. At the time of her death on the 31st July 1912, she was living with her son James, at 61 Buckland St Chippendale Sydney.

James indicated that her parents names were James Whitehouse and Bridget McNally, but on tracing records it seems feasible that he didn’t know their Christian names , or there was a mix-up on the form , as his name was James and his wife’s was Bridget. It appears more than likely that Emma (he spelt it Amelia) was actually Elizabeth Emelia Whitehouse born at The Sand Hills (later Surrey Hills) in Sydney and baptised on 25th July 1833 at St Mary’s Cathedral, Sydney.

Her parents were recorded as Albert Whitehouse (printer) and Elizabeth McNally.

Emma is easily adapted from Emelia.

Family vocal history has always indicated that there was a connection with Henry Kendall, it is most likely that Emma’s mother , Elizabeth was a sister of Melinda McNally who married Basil Kendall and subsequently had a son Henry Kendall, the poet. This made Emma his first cousin.

There was no ‘Bridget’ McNally in that family and all other sisters have been accounted for, so this adds weight to the family vocal history and the evidence pointing to Emma’s parents being Albert and Elizabeth (known as Eliza). The ship she came to Australia with the Mcnally Family in 1814 was the Broxbornebury, but on the Baptism cert for Emma it says ship’ 5 Islands’, this is a mystery, but no record of a ship of that name appears to have existed. It could have been the journey they came on as the Broxenbornbury did pass islands and pick up some stranded people, and it is not unlikely that a child of ten would mix up the name of a ship later on. Her parents were Patrick McNally and Judith Kilfroy McDermott, he was convicted for desertion from the 100thregiment whilst serving in Canada and sent out for life.

Albert was a convict, convicted and sentenced for life at Worcester on the 8/3/1828 and sent on the ship Eliza. Records in the Sydney gazette of mid 1833 show an Albert Whitehouse, printer up on charges of forgery. He got off, due to lack of evidence, but others where charged, at the time he worked for a lithographer ( Henry Allen) in Pitt St as a printer. He was described as an artist on Emma’s death certificate, and a printer on her baptism certificate.

A comment was made in the court of being sent out for inappropriate use of printing skills.

Records show that an Albert Whitehouse died in 1833, it hasn’t been confirmed that that was him, but it seems a strange coincidence that Emma was baptised in July 1833 after having been born in 1831. Maybe he died and Elizabeth then baptised her a catholic. There is no record of any other children born to them.

There is a record of an Elizabeth Whitehouse death in 1857 at age 68 in Sydney, and also an Elizabeth Whitehouse appears on the 1841 census living at Surrey hills. Not yet proven that this was Emma’s mother but, Emma was born at the Sand Hills which later became part of Surrey Hills. To date no marriage record for Albert and Elizabeth has been found.

Another coincidence is that Emma and Thomas’s son James was also involved in the printing business, being a compositor. Moya Britten (William Bollard’s granddaughter, James’s grand niece) remembers James coming to visit her grandparents, at the Captains Flat Store, with all his newspaper friends.  William would take them to the river on fishing trips, leaving Bedelia to mind the store.  She also has vivid memories of visiting James when she was a child when they lived in Stanmore, after they moved from Chippendale. She can recall the smell of gas from cooking and perhaps lights etc of that area. She was terrified of a lady in the street who would go out into her front yard in her night dress.

James served in the 1st Pioneer Battalion, 5th Reinforcement, from Oct 1915 to July 1917 at the Western Front from August 1916 to July 1917.

_____________________________

MENTION OF THE TERM 5 ISLANDS

http://www.walkabout.com.au/locations/NSWWollongong.shtml

 

The Five Islands was the name given to the Illawarra region by the explorers of the late 1700’s and early 1800’s.The earliest reference to this has been traced to Bass (of Bass and Flinders fame) Journal in the Whaleboat.

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POEM : HENRY KENDALL by his MOTHER

REFERENCE POINTS WITHIN THE POEM. 

HENRY KENDALL

(By his mother)

1 He was born at the foot of the mountain,

2 He was taught his first letters in sand;

3 His companions – mimosas and gum trees –

4 And the beautiful birds of the land.

5 To his ear the wild scream of the curlew

6 Was sweeter than sweetest of fruits;

7 And the silvery tinkling of bell birds,

8 More soothing than ladies’ fine lutes.

________________________________

SO far we have Henry established under Pigeon House Mountain at birth.

 

bellbird2

BELLBIRD

 

 

 

curlew2

CURLEW

3 – Mimosa seems remarkably widespread on the South Coast of NSW. I thought it were an entirely different plant but now find it another name for plants with which I am familiar.

mimosaMimosa (1)

Best I also locate an image of some gum trees for those of you who haven’t had a gum tree as a companion.

gum treeill-lgw-eec

 

 

 

 

 

 

A LETTER FROM JANE

The letter is from one of Mrs Hamilton-Grey’s books. She says that it is from JANE, the eldest daughter of Basil and Melinda who is named on Melinda’s death certificate. Jane was a teacher and is said to have worked with Caroline Chisholm at one time. She was born CHRISTINA JANE in 1842 and lived till 1903 when she died in the Granville District of Sydney.The letter appeals to me partially due to its being the only one we have found and also because of the poignant mention of her mother who receives a ‘bad press’ from Henry and other recountants.

WRITTEN FROM PITT-STREET TO A NIECE ( IF this is a blood niece then it would be the daughter of either Henry or Edith Emily. Mary Josephine is already dead by this time and therefore  is not the niece’s ‘mother’ to whom Jane refers in the letter. Basil Edward died without marriage or children that we know of. It is more likely to be Emily than Henry’s widow Charlotte due to the unhappy connections of the family with her. There is also a possibility of the niece not being “niece” in the technical sense of that word. However, Jane writes the following with affection.)

2 August 1895

My Dear ____________,

    I was much pleased to get your long letter; indeed it made up for your mother’s two or three lines,although they are always welcome. I am glad you are soon to be settled in life, and hope you may be happy. In most cases it depends on ourselves whether we are happy or miserable. We make our own little world, for either good or evil. Commence your married life as you intend to end it. Meet one another halfway and all will be well.  I am glad , for your sake,  that your “Boy” is a temperance man, but there are other Sins besides Drunkenness. I had a letter from Mr Simpson last week. He never forgets you and your mother. I am going to write to him this week and will not forget to tell him of your engagement, etc. He is quite well, his letters are a comfort to me, so cheerful and consoling. You do not seem to be in a hurry to get married;and your ‘love’ does not seem very “hot”; but I think you will always be better for that;from what I have read about “hot love” it soon gets cold. You must know ( or your mother will tell you ) I was never in love myself except with my dear old mother – so that I cannot give you any points about love; but write and tell me about all your affairs. I am much interested. Wishing you all happiness and with love to your mother, believe me,

Your affectionate

Aunt Jane.

 

woman_readin_24755_md1892

Representational graphic only. This is NOT Jane Kendall. Courtesy of ETC FLORIDA

 

 

http://www.myheritage.com/site-29770641/melinda-mcnally-kendall-web-site

Thanks to TG for passing on extensive photocopies of information.

IN THIS YEAR – 1837 – including selected poetry

1837 has now come to our attention as a very significant year in the life of MELINDA MCNALLY KENDALL. She married BASIL O KENDALL in 1835, on the 1 August . A child appears to have been born shortly later and then died . Those details are under investigation now. Basil and Melinda were living in Sydney at this time. They are still there  in early 1837 when a series of very dodgy events take place. In fact there is strong indication that BASIL and DODGY are inseparable terms. SYDNEY in 1837 – lets look at the NATIONAL LIBRARY AUSTRALIAN HISTORIC NEWSPAPERS and see what was happening in Sydney in this time. The KENDALL Boys are working for THOS BARKER at one or other of his mills. What else is happening as a background to the life of this young wife.

I have included some lines of verse published in that year. The first proven MELINDA poems were published in ILLAWARRA MERCURY in the early 1880s but it is believed from anecdotal evidence that she wrote in years much earlier than that. I have therefore included other lines by other poets published as were hers in the Newsapers. We know she grew up on the Hawkesbury Banks as did Harpur and Tompson. Obviously she is the parent preceding the poetry of HENRY KENDALL. As to what when and where she was writing – the search continues. In the meantime – 1837 in SYDNEY. Her year of marital alteration.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2187360

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 11 January 1827, page 1.

TOMPSON’S POEMS:

NOTICE.-Mr. Robert HOWE alone is impowered hy me to receive Payment for the Copies of this Work, which are, or may be, delivered to Subscribers. C. TOMPSON. Clydesdale, Dec. 30, 1826.

Also for sale was a book of sacred poetry, the sales of which would be appropriated towards the debt incurred in building the SCOT CHURCH. Rev Mr Dunmore Lang’s poems these were.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208646

An original piece of poetry from 1837.

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 3 January 1837, page 3.

ORIGINAL POETRY

The following doggerel we publish for

the amusement of our readers ; they are

evidently from the pen of some school

boy not yet out of his teens. The last

lines of the two last verses made us laugh

outright ; but let them speak for them-

selves : –

LINES TO MISS -.

You’ll press my hand-you’ll kiss my brow,

And thrill in my embrace ;

But when I’m gone what doubts will throw

Their wildness on thy face

You’ve held me-press’d me to your heart,

Your lips have clung to mine ;

Then sworn your love-you could not part

Such happ ness was thine.

And when our lips in passion mov’d

— Responsive to our bliss.

”I was then you said how true you lov’d,

No words could equal this.

. . .

Now you doubt me-and you’ve spurn’d me,

Because (you know not why)

All my gilts-they are returned me

With not e’en tear or sigh !

Well ! since ’tis so, we’d better part,

So now I’ll say-” Farewell !”

I’ve left some fraction of my heart,

And that I’ll use right well .

But-hate me-this is all I’ll ask

In future girl from thee;

I thought ‘twould be a heavier task –

But thank my stars I’m free.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208685

The Sydney Gazette and…
Thursday 5 January 1837

ROBERT LILLY who was steward on the ISABELLA stands in court accused of stealing a quantity of tortoiseshell.

CHARLES MORGAN LEWIS who was COMMANDER of the ISABELLA – identifies the tortoiseshell and states that he has never seen one piece of tortoiseshell which was like another.

The penalty for stealing tortoiseshell was no small thing.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208694

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 5 January 1837, page 4

LINES

BY ELIZABETH ANN BRIDGES, AGED

ELEVEN YEARS:

On her Sister Margaret Jane, who died June 14,

1833. aged nine years and eleven months.

On that sad morn we stood around her bed,

And gazed upon her altered countenance,

Each feature bore the stamp of death –

Death held her firmly in his cruel grasp ;

READ ON –

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208755

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 10 January 1837, page 4.

STANZAS.

I saw thee ‘mid the festive blaze

Of many a laughing, sunny eye ;

And sylph-like through the dance’s maze

Glide gracefully.

I saw the thousands round thy throne,

And all the glory gather’d there;

And then I felt for me alone

Was dark despair.

Thy forms undimm’d, thy joyous eye

Creates an atmosphere of light ;

And angels love to wander nigh

A gem so bright.

But look on me. There was a time,

When I could smile as well as thou,

And glory in unwasted time;

How alter’d now !

. .. .. .. …

If thou art happy, why not I ?

Thy bridal wreath I gladly twine,

Fix the last, sacred bud, and die,

All joy is thine.

. . . .

Live ,then, another’s heart to bless;

But when a new-form’d grave you see,

Dark with the dullest loneliness,

Then think of me !

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208809 AUTHORS ARE LIKE SHEEP.

THEY RUN AFTER ONE ANOTHER WITHOUT KNOWING THE WHY OR WHEREFORE.

READ ON : It is followed by an intriguing discourse on ROMANICISM and the CONVERSION OF A CATHOLIC PRIEST.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208813

SELECT POETRY of a love parted across the seas.

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 12 January 1837, page 4.

THE PARTED GIRL

The evening shades have gather’d o’er
Yon bark upon the billow

READ ON

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208960

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 21 January 1837, page 4

TO MY WIFE

I’VE SLIGHTED THEE , I’VE BLIGHTED THEE

READ ON : This is a deeply moving piece. Slighted and Blighted in Heart but not in Fame. The Fame remains unsullied.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2209084

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 28 January 1837, page 3.

CHARMING JACK “ whilst playing billiards with other lads ‘of similar kidney ‘ exited with the BLACK BALL. BLACK-BALLED himself they called it. It was in a public house in Castlereagh-street  kept by MR BROWN and his wife.

READ ON TO DISCOVER HIS FATE BEFORE THE BENCH :

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-articl e2209381

ASSIGNED SERVANTS.

A COMPLAINT IS MADE by an ENQUIRER as to why the NEW SETTLERS are having to wait for extended periods for servants to be assigned to them.

Ship after ship goes past and still they have no men. The EDITOR of the SYDNEY GAZETTE promises that  he will have more to say on the subject if the Enquirer’s complaints be proven to be true.

HENRY’S AFFAIRS OF THE 1880s

The Maitland Mercury… Thursday 12 May 1881, page 5

INSPECTOR OF STATE FORESTS.-The Herald says:-Mr. Henry Kendall, the well-known Australian poet, has been appointed by the Government Inspector of State forests. The appointment is a new one, and the duties appertaining to the position will be those of a head forest ranger, or of an officer who is required to examine the condition of the natural forests of the colony, and to report upon their present state and the facilities at hand for their preservation, land for planting out forest trees in suitable places. For some five or six years past Mr. Kendall has been residing at Camden Haven, and during that time he has devoted himself in a singular manner the study of this question, forming the acquaintance of timber-getters, and acquiring a thorough knowledge of forestry.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article817215

( Interesting way to describe Henry’s life. Knew quite a few hard drinking men did the Henry . Very noble of him. )

 

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 5 August 1882, page 4

Henry Kendall the poet, was buried yesterday at Waverley Cemetery, in the presence of a large
number of friends

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article855626

 

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 9 September 1882 Supplement

Extraordinary meeting was held at the School of Arts yesterday, for the purpose of assisting to supplement the Kendall fund. Subscriptions were received, and arrangements made for a public meeting next Saturday. Among others present were Dr. J. G. Smith, Mr. T. Bawden, and Mr. J. Hewitt, old friends of the deceased poet. Dr. Smith suggested that Henry Kendall having identified himself with the Clarence for so many years, and where, together with the late James Lionel Michael, also a poet, Kendall is said to have first courted the muses, that steps be taken, with the aid of the central committee, to found a scholarship in the Grafton public school, to be called the Kendall prize. No doubt a considerable amount of money will be raised in Grafton and the surrounding district.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article857422

 

The Maitland Mercury… Tuesday

30 January 1883, page 5

Mr John Duffy, overseer of the Botanic Gardens, has been appointed Inspector of Forests, in the room of the late Henry Kendall

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article864096

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 10 February 1883, page 4.

The subscription lists for the Kendall fund were called in yesterday, forty of them contained the gross amount of £4 15s. More than half this sum was collected by Chinese. The majority of the lists were blank.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article866841

(What are the implications of this one ?)

 

ONE MORE HENRY ARTICLE : THE REST YOU CAN FIND ON NLA

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article855937

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article855679

CLARENCE RIVER IN NLA NEWSPAPERS OF 1852

The year that Basil Kendall died on the CLARENCE RIVER.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article675606

His Excellency the Governor General has

been pleased to appoint the under-mentioned

gentlemen to be magistrates of the territory

and its dependencies, viz..

Charles Blaxland, Esq., of Merriwa.

George Henry Cox, Esq., of Mudgee.

William John Dangar, Esq., of Neotsfield,

Hunter River.

Basil Dickinson, Esq ,of Mudgee ,

John Everett, Esq., of Ollera, New England.

Jeremiah Grant, Esq, of Hartley.

William Hardy, Esq, of the Turon River.

Charles King,Esq, of the Turon River.

Charles Bland Lowe, Esq, of Mudgee.

Thomas John Markham, Esq. of Armidale ,

Francis Marsh, Esq, of Camira,

Clarence River.

Francis Murphy, Esq, of Tarawingee, Ovens River.

George Polhill, Esq , of Wellingrove.

John Anderson Robertson, Esq., of the district

of Bligh.

Jacob Meade Swift, Esq., of Brisbane,

Moreton Bay.

Frederick Vigne, Esq., of Tenterden, New England.

Robert Wilkin, Esq, of Yenolah, Gayndah.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article675397

WANTED, an AGENT for the MAITLAND MERCURY at GRAFTON.

Clarence River. Applications to be addressed

R. JONES,

Mercury Office, Maitland

______________________

THE FINDING OF GOLD NEAR GRAFTON 

JAN 1852

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article675162

______________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article674746

AGENT WANTED FOR THE MAITLAND MERCURY AT GRAFTON

_______________________

SHEEP STATION FOR SALE

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article674383

________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article669244

THE OUTRAGEOUS PRICE OF LAND

Finally, Mr. Fry, crown commissioner for the

Clarence River District, when asked whether

any land in the pastoral districts would sell for

5s. an acre, replies-” It is impossible to calcu-

late upon the amount of folly that may exist

in the community. Some might be sold, but I

am sure it would not pay.”

__________________________

NLA NEWSPAPERS – MRS KENDALL AND CHILDREN 1881

 

FROM THE BRISBANE COURIER MAIL OCTOBER 1881: PURELY SPECULATIVE. MARY JOSPEHINE YATES, MELINDA’S DAUGHTER DIED FROM INFLAMMATION OF THE LUNGS EARLY IN 1881 AT HER HOME IN MARYBOROUGH. IN OCTOBER OF THE SAME YEAR A MRS KENDALL WITH CHILDREN APPEARS IN THE SHIPPING NEWS.

  1. ON THE LADY BOWEN SAILING INTO BRISBANE FROM ROCKHAMPTON VIA BUNDABERG AND MARYBOROUGH
  2. ON THE GOVERNOR BLACKALL WITH 8 CHILDREN SAILING SOUTH FOR SYDNEY

WHICH MRS KENDALL IS THIS ? IS IT CONNECTED WITH THE DEATH OF MARY JOSEPHINE YATES?

IT COULD WELL BE MRS JOSEPH KENDALL , WIFE OF CAPTAIN JOSEPH KENDALL, BUT SHE IS A PEER OF MELINDA’S AND AS UNLIKELY TO BE TRAVELLING WITH CHILDREN AS MELINDA. COULD MELINDA HAVE BROUGHT HER GRANDCHILDREN SOUTH FOR A TIME ? WE KNOW LITTLE OF THESE YEARS .

mrs k shippingarticle911732-4-001The Brisbane Courier, Monday 24 October 1881, page 2

 mrs kendall on blackall

Actually does it say Randall or Kendall?

 

MELINDA KENDALL : HER LIFE AND WRITINGS