Category Archives: CANADA

1812 WAR NORTH AMERICA : RANDOM LINKS.

A SHORT CHRONOLOGY
The War of 1812 in the Northwest

http://www.ohiohistory.org/onlinedoc/war1812/chronology/0004.html

OHIO HISTORY.

SHORT CHRONOLOGY INC TIME PERIOD WHEN PATRICK MCNALLY WAS COURTMARTIALLED.

A SHORT CHRONOLOGY
The War of 1812 in the Northwest

1812–WINCHESTER’S CAMPAIGN, October 2-November, early.

1812, October 2. General Harrison hears from General Winchester that the British have retreated. He orders General Barbee to return to St. Mary’s and Colonel Poague to cut a road from Ft. Jennings to Ft. Defiance. The rest of the army continues its march in five columns, about 1,000 men. Harrison arrives at Winchester’s camp and finds the troops disgusted and dispirited. Ft. Winchester is laid out near old Ft. Defiance and is built by a detachment of 250 men under the orders of Major Joseph Robb. Harrison then returns to St. Mary’s with Colonel R. M. Johnson, where these troops are discharged October 7th. Colonel Poague is ordered to return to the Ottawa Towns, about 12 miles above St. Mary’s and there to erect a fort (Ft. Amanda). General Winchester receives the command of the left wing of the Northwest Army from Harrison.

1812, October 4. Before Harrison left Defiance, he ordered General Edward Tupper to take all of his 800 mounted men down the Maumee to the Rapids and even farther if he should find it necessary to disperse the enemy. He was to return to Ft. Defiance or the Ottawa Towns on Blanchard’s Fork. He was supposed to leave October 5, but an alarm in camp occasioned by the sighting of some Indians across the river who fire into the American camp keep him at Ft. Defiance.

1812, October 6. General Edward Tupper send Logan and six other Indians down the river to reconnoitre. General Winchester orders Tupper to advance, but Tupper says he is awaiting the return of his spies. When his spies come back they report seeing only about 50 Indians.

1812, October 7. General Tupper wants to go to the Rapids by way of the Ottawa Towns on Blanchard’s Fork; his force is considerably hurt when about 300 mounted riflemen, whose terms had run out and who were disgusted with Tupper, leave the camp for home.

1812, October 8. General Winchester orders Colonel Slimrall to return to the Ohio settlements with his mounted regiment to recruit his horses. Orders are given to General Tupper to begin his expedition, but many of the men did not want to serve under Tupper. Colonel Allen tenders his services to Tupper in any capacity they would be received. General Winchester misunderstands Allen’s wishes and directs him to take the command and march to the Rapids. Allen tells Winchester of the mistake and the order is withdrawn. Meanwhile, most of the men have refused to march directly to the Rapids and General Tupper marches them to the Auglaize, thence to the Ottawa Towns, where he tells them that reinforcements are on their way from Ohio. At this point, the troops, except for about 200, refuse to continue to the Rapids. Tupper then proceeds by the most direct route to Urbana and discharges only those who have been willing at all times to obey. For this Tupper is court-martialed by Winchester. Meanwhile, Tupper has marched his remaining force as far as McArthur’s fort on Hull’s trace and the court martial is delayed. When the court is held later, Tupper is acquitted.

1812, November, early. General Tupper sends a spy company under Captain Hinkston to reconnoitre the Rapids. There the captain discovers a British captain named Clarke and takes him prisoner. He reports that there were 3-400 Indians and 75 British at the Rapids to gather corn.

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http://www.ohiohistory.org/onlinedoc/war1812/chronology/0017.html

1812, September 27. General Harrison sends an express to Pittsburgh, ordering artillery and supplies from thence to proceed to Georgetown on the Ohio and from thence by New Lisbon and Canton to Wooster.

1812, October 1. General Harrison marches his troops in rain and mud, past Ft. Jennings, where foot troops are halted.

1812, c. October 5. General Harrison, at St. Mary’s, is informed that Indians are again collecting to attack Ft. Wayne. He sends a detachment of 1,500 mounted volunteers under Colonel Allen Trimble to Ft. Wayne and then on to White Pidgeon’s Town on the headwaters of St. Joseph’s of the Lake, about 60 miles from Ft. Wayne. When Trimble arrives at Ft. Wayne, 1/2 of his command refuses to go farther; he takes the part which will advance and destroys the Indian villages.

 

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http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/

United States — History — War of 1812 – Fiction

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CANADA – 1812 WAR – MORE RESOURCES

 

 

  BROCK AND CO

Sketches illustrating the early settlement and history of Glengarry in Canada : relating principally to the revolutionary war of 1775-83, the war of 1812-14 and the rebellion of 1837-8, and the services of the King’s Royal regiment of New York, the 84th or Royal Highland regiment, the Glengarry light infantry regiment, and the Glengarry militia (1893)

Macdonell, J. A. (John Alexander), 1851-1930

MAPHow Canada was Held for the Empire The Story of the War of 1812 (1905)

The annals of the war : illustrated by a selection of historical ballads (1913?)

Harper, J. M. (John Murdoch), 1845-1919

WHIRLPOOL ABOVE NIAGARA

History of the American troops, during the late war, under the command of Colonels Fenton and Campbell, giving an account of the crossing of the Lake from Erie to Long Point; also, the crossing of Niagara by the troops under Gen’ls Gaines, Brown, Scott and Porter. The taking of Fort Erie, the battle of Chippewa, the imprisonment of Col. Bull, Major Galloway, and the author (then a captain) and their treatment; together with an historical account of the Canadas (1830)

 White, Samuel

AMERICAN VIEW

history of american troopslate war

Ten years of Upper Canada in peace and war, 1805-1815 : being the Ridout letters with annotations (1890)

Ridout, Thomas, 1754-1829 ; Edgar, Matilda Ridout, Lady, 1844-1910

thomas ridout

 JAMES HANNAY How Canada was Held for the Empire: The Story of the War of 1812

KINGS REGIMENT

A beautiful rebel : a romance of Upper Canada in eighteen hundred and twelve (1909)

Campbell, Wilfred, 1858?-1918

http://www.archive.org/details/beautifulrebelro00campuoft

womanlean_16630_md

BRITISH MILITARY – DESERTION and OTHER ODDMENTS

Back to the 1812 War and Canada. From the INTERNET ARCHIVE, some more books and notes including articles referring to DESERTERS in the Military. Patrick McNally was absent from his Regiment from 1810-1812 and his court martial resulted in his transportation to New South Wales. To place him in the context of the times and places, here are some other desertions and their consequences.

Officers of the British forces in Canada during the war of 1812-15 (1908)

Irving, L. Homfray; Canadian Military Institute

PATRICK MCNALLY  was a soldier of the 100 Regiment in Canada at the time of his Court Martial.

REGIMENTS OF CANADA 100

http://www.archive.org/details/officersofbritis00irvi 

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FROM THE CALEDONIAN MERCURY APRIL 13 1812. GLASGOW.

+1809$&inPS=true&searchType=AdvancedSearchForm&scale=0.33&enlarge=&nav=next&docPage=article">PETER NEISH 

desertionCaledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, April 13, 1812 Issue 14090desertion

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THE HULL PACKET AND ORIGINAL WEEKLY. 1809 JULY 18

The Hull Packet and Original Weekly Commercial, Literary and General Advertiser (Hull, England), Tuesday, July 18, 1809; Issue 1175.

The American War, 1812-1814 By Philip Katcher, Bryan Fosten

The American War, 1812-1814

By Philip Katcher, Bryan Fosten

Typically the United States is said to have declared war on Great Britain in 1812 because of the Royal Navy’s impressment of American seamen and the British desire to create an Indian buffer state. An Englishman William